What can I sow in my greenhouse in Autumn and Winter?

What can I sow in my greenhouse in Autumn and Winter?

Eager to get sowing in your greenhouse now but aren't sure where to begin? Here's our monthly guide from September to February.

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Month by Month Sowing Suggestions from September to February

Have you just had a brand new greenhouse installed but it’s cold outside? Simply cannot wait until spring to get in there and become the horticultural god or goddess you always knew you could be?

Well never fear!

The biggest positive for growing under glass is the opportunity to grow more throughout the year. It might not be the easiest time to start, but there are still many ways to grow in your greenhouse during the autumn and winter months.

close up seeds being sown in compostable pots

 

Jump to monthly sowing guide

Before we get to the sowing guide, here are some quick tips and knowledge nuggets for cold weather growing:

  • Patience is Key - There will be a variety of things you can sow in autumn and winter, but the vast majority will be slow growing seedlings for planting out in the spring.
  • Slow and Steady Wins the Race – Plants started early in a greenhouse will be grateful for added protection and will provide much stronger, happier plants when the time comes for planting out.
  • Get Ahead of the Game - Some hardy vegetable varieties can also be sown in the autumn for an early spring harvest.
  • Choose the Right Varieties - If you want things you can sow and harvest between the autumn and spring equinoxes, you’ll want fast-growing, cold-tolerant varieties.
  • Keep Frost Out – the biggest challenge for any greenhouse gardener in winter is keeping the frost out. You can install heaters or insulate with bubblewrap – whatever option you take, resist the chill as much as possible!

And if you have a heated greenhouse, all the better! You will have lots more options.

So without further ado, here is our monthly guide for ideas on what flowers and vegetables you can sow and plant during the cold months. But make sure you check the plant’s requirements before you start buying seed packets en-masse as some will need more attention than others, even with the aid of a greenhouse.

 

September

For Eating:

  1. Spring Cabbage – for early spring
  2. Spinach – for early spring crop
  3. Salad Crops – for year-round cropping
  4. Peas – for early spring crop
  5. Broad Beans – for early spring crop
  6. Radishes – for autumn crop
  7. Turnips – for autumn and winter crop
  8. Onions Sets – for spring planting
  9. Garlic Cloves – for spring planting
  10. Microgreens – for year-round cropping
  11. Hardy Spring Onions – for spring cropping
  12. Pak Choi – for winter crop
  13. Herbs – for year-round cropping
  14. Spring Cabbages – for sprint planting
  15. New Potatoes - for Christmas cropping

For Flowers:

  1. Euphorbia
  2. Dierama
  3. Calendula
  4. Violas
  5. Lupins
  6. Aquilegia
  7. Hollyhocks
  8. Echinops
  9. Perennial Salvias
  10. Helenium
  11. Hellebores
  12. Foxgloves
  13. Spring Bulbs – Daffodils, Crocus, Hyacinths
  14. Summer Bulbs – Lilies, Alliums, Crocosmia

 

October

For Eating:

  1. Peas – for early spring crop
  2. Salad Leaves – for year-round cropping
  3. Winter Lettuce – for winter crop
  4. Broad Beans – for early spring crop
  5. Cauliflower – for spring planting
  6. Microgreens – for year-round cropping
  7. Hardy Spring Onions – for spring cropping
  8. Shallot Sets – for spring planting
  9. Pak Choi – for winter crop
  10. Herbs – for year-round cropping
  11. Carrots – for early spring crop

For Flowers:

  1. Crepis
  2. Hollyhocks
  3. Sweet Peas
  4. Aquilegia
  5. Oriental Poppies
  6. Hellebores
  7. Foxgloves
  8. Summer Bulbs – Lilies, Alliums, Crocosmia

 

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November

For Eating:

  1. Microgreens – for year-round cropping
  2. Broad Beans – for spring crop
  3. Carrots – for early spring crop
  4. Herbs – for year-round cropping

For Flowers:

  1. Sweet Peas
  2. Cyclamen
  3. Delphinium
  4. Verbascum
  5. Foxglove
  6. Lupin
  7. Tulips

 

December

For Eating:

  1. Broad Beans – for spring crop
  2. Onions, Shallots Sets – for spring planting
  3. Garlic Cloves – for spring planting
  4. Winter Lettuce – for winter crop
  5. Lamb’s Lettuce – for winter crop
  6. Mustard Greens – for winter crop
  7. Microgreens – for year-round cropping
  8. Carrots – for early spring crop
  9. Herbs – for year-round cropping

For Flowers:

  1. Antirrhinums (Snapdragons)
  2. Laurentia
  3. Begonia
  4. Geranium
  5. Cyclamen

 

filling compostable pots with compost, soil cascading from a man's hands

January

For Eating:

  1. Onions, Shallots, Garlic – for spring planting
  2. Microgreens – for year-round cropping
  3. Broad Beans – for early summer crop
  4. Lettuces – for spring crop
  5. Cabbages – for early summer crop
  6. Cauliflowers – for early summer crop
  7. Spinach
  8. Salad Onions – for spring crop
  9. Onion Seeds – for spring planting
  10. Carrots – for spring crop
  11. Herbs – for year-round cropping
  12. Chitting Potatoes – for spring planting

For Flowers:

  1. Snapdragons
  2. Begonia
  3. Geranium
  4. Dianthus
  5. Lobelia
  6. Sweet Peas

 

February

For Eating:

  1. Onions, Shallots, Garlic – for spring planting
  2. Microgreens – for year-round cropping
  3. Onion Seeds – for spring planting
  4. Carrots – for spring crop
  5. Herbs – for year-round cropping
  6. Chitting Potatoes – for spring planting
  7. Peas – for spring planting
  8. Aubergine – for summer crop
  9. Brassicas – for spring planting
  10. Leeks – for spring planting

For Flowers:

  1. Lobelia
  2. Begonia Tubers
  3. Snapdragons
  4. Dahlia tubers
  5. Sweet Peas
  6. Chrysanthemum
  7. Geraniums

 

 

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