April Gardening Tips

April Gardening Tips

It’s the mixed month of April showers, late frosts, sunshine, lawn mowers on a Sunday morning and children enjoying the garden again.

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April is full of the joys of spring and we can busily sow seeds, enjoy warmer days and get ready for the growing season ahead.

Primroses can be propagated easily by division, so just lift and divide them before replanting and removing any dead or damaged leaves and flowers. Its a great way to double up on Primroses for following years. For some tips from Gardeners World have a read HERE.

If you have enjoyed some forced flower bulbs such as Daffodils or Hyacinths, they will mostly finished flowering now but don't throw them away! Plant them outside and enjoy them again next year.

It’s fine to deadhead Daffodils and Tulips that have finished their Spring displays but leave all of the foliage to naturally die back. This ensure all of the energy needed returns to the bulb for them to flower again the following year. When the foliage has turned yellow or brown its time to remove it.

Plant chitted potatoes outside, ensuring they are placed in a trench with the ‘rose’ facing upwards. Fill the trench with soil and don't forget to earth them up as they grow and keep an eye out for potato blight.

Freshly pulled potatoes in hands

Blossom on fruit trees if necessary for fruit to grow. We often experience frosts all the way into May and that can damage blossom and therefore your crops. As a gardener, you should always keep an eye on the weather, so if you see temperatures are dropping, protect your fruit trees with some horticultural fleece or fleece tree covers.

If you are growing sweet peas and started them off in March, they should be at a size where they require pinching out. It can help to promote bushy growth and therefore more flowers. Pinching off the top when you have at least three or four sets of true leaves will really help. For more information on growing Sweet Peas, take a look at this advice LINK.

Birds will be preparing for nesting and April is a great time to encourage birds to enjoy your garden. If you don't already and even in urban environments, put up a bird feeder and some water to see what you can attract.

Have a think about what plants you can grow which will also feed garden birds. Generally plants that have easy to access seed heads are ideal and any which attract insects for birds to eat. Sunflowers, Globe Thistles and Teasels are great choices and will attract a wide variety of species.

Our gardens are essential to bees survival, so plant lovely purples which they can see and single flowers for easy access plus tubular shapes flowers. So a mix of Dahlias, Foxgloves and early flowering plants such as Campanula and Fennel along with late flowering Asters, Scabious and Sedums.

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